30. Gateway

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They moved faster now and reached their destination within twenty minutes. Dusk crept into the sky and the flood had subsided a little. When they peered down into the canyon, the dwindling light showed them that they would have to wait a while longer until they could climb down to the entrance of their objective.
Vox busied himself with putting his helmet back on and giving directions to their brothers to find their way back to them. Apart from his occasional comments, the two Astartes stood silent guard over their human.
When the night had fallen fully, Titus descended into the canyon first. When he found that the water only reached to his waist now, he called the others after him.
Vox took Solomon on his shoulders and climbed down to avoid using the jump pack again. He slipped on the last few metres of wet rock and landed heavily in a great splash, not daring to roll away to compensate for his momentum since he would have squashed the legate with his weight. He straightened up and gently grasped Solomon’s legs that were dangling left and right of his neck.
“You alright?”, he wanted to know.
“Just wet”, Solomon replied bravely and uncurled his arms from Vox’s helmet. Despite his words, Titus was sure that the man had been caught between Vox’s shoulder guards when they fell and that his thighs must have been heavily bruised.
They stood in the darkness, the water flowing around them. There was nothing to see but raw stone walls everywhere and the soft reflections of starlight on the moving surface around them.
“This is it?”, Solomon asked a little uncertainly, rubbing the burn mark on the left side of his face with his left, mechanical hand. He started to shiver in the cool air.
Vox slowly walked up to one part of the wall that looked no different than the rest of the canyon. He gently took Solomon’s organic hand and guided it to a point at head height for an Astartes. “Somewhere here”, he informed him.
“Ah, yes”, Solomon said, leaning forward. “This must be the lock!” His fingers danced searchingly over the stone for a moment then, he took out the ominous key from the Dark Age of Technology. The legate turned the cube over a few times and looked closely at the hole in the rock they had found. “I will need light. Are we alone?”, Solomon wanted to know.
“Yes”, Vox confirmed after a few heartbeats.
Solomon took out a small lamp and its bright, circular light illuminated the lock and the key. Again Solomon turned the cube this way and that and watched it closely. His scar rippled oddly as he grimaced in thought. Meanwhile, Vox had bowed down and leaned his head against the wall to bring the man as close to the lock as possible. Titus had to hide a smile. Seeing them working together as politely and smoothly as this was almost endearing.
“What are you doing?”, Titus inquired of the legate.
“I’m checking if there is a direction in which the cube is meant to be used”, Solomon explained. “I don’t want any self-defence mechanisms going off if I slide it in wrong. This should be it.” He pushed the cube into the wall.
There was hardly any noise. A hollow clicking, a quiet scraping when the door opened, followed by the sound of the water coming in.
“I hope they made whatever is in there waterproof”, Solomon said.
“Well, they made the door waterproof”, Titus answered and waded after Vox, the water flowing in with them.
The initial corridor was short. Beyond it, they entered a circular room.
In the light, Solomon had left on, they made out a simple, but delicately cut relief on the smooth, rounded wall. All of them recognized what it showed immediately. Even though the landmasses looked a bit different than they had come to know them from pictures, there was no doubt about it: It was an image of Terra.
A panel protruded from the swirling water in the middle of the room.
“That looks like an elevator”, Solomon said. “And I don’t think it’ll go up.”
Vox nodded, took him off his shoulders and handed him to Titus like someone would hand around a child. The water had sunken under waist height now but, for the human, this still meant sinking in to his chest and there was a current, even noticeable for someone with the weight of an Astartes.
“Give me the lamp”, Vox demanded softly and got it as soon as Solomon sat safely on Titus’ left shoulder guard. They lost no words about Vox going down there alone. He was the one with a working helmet and could still vox underwater while one of them had to stay up here to protect Solomon.
Calmly, the librarian walked up to the panel. It lit up by itself even as he came close and showed a few mystic signs. Vox laid his hand on one and the floor beneath him started to sink down slowly. Titus braced himself. As he had anticipated the current increased suddenly when the elevator had sunken beyond the thickness of the floor. With force, the water streamed through the wider gap while the platform became a circular waterfall with Vox sinking down in the middle.
In his armour, a Space Marine was heavy enough that he could easily walk underwater. For a moment, they saw the light he carried flicker and reflect in the swirling current in the middle of the room then, it went away. They waited in silence, the water line dropping lower and lower. After a long while, the circular waterfall got quieter and finally stopped. Whatever space was down there, was now filled with water. Left in the upper room was just a waterline that reached lower than Titus’ knee and thus he put the legate down. The man straightened his clothing, waded between him and the wall and said nothing, just waited patiently, shivering in the cold.
“I’ve reached a corridor full of doors”, was the first they heard from Vox. “If there is a machine spirit in here, I can’t find it and they won’t open with force. I’ll move on.”
Again it took a while until Vox came in again. The water was just knee-high for Solomon now.
“I’ve reached a room with a pillar in the middle”, Vox told them. “It’s about fifty paces across and has small compartments all along the wall. They are at about chest-height for me. I don’t see another exit.”
On a signal of the legate, Titus knelt down next to Solomon and opened the channel so he could talk to Vox directly.
“Look at the pillar, please”, the man said and, in the sparse light that filtered in from outside, the expression of his burned face suddenly got intense.
Vox was quiet for a moment. “It is about a metre in diameter and made of the white stone outside. Looks like a natural formation. What am I looking for?”
“For any kind of switch, button, panel or opening”, Solomon said.
Again, there was silence for a minute.
“A part of the pillar can be rotated”, Vox informed them. “There is a cube in here. It is clamped into some kind of holding mechanism.”
“Describe it, please!”, Solomon asked.
“From the bottom and top of the compartment protrudes a triangular bar each. It splits in three and this way clamps the cube, which is standing on its points. Does that make sense to you?”, Vox inquired a little uncertainly.
“Yes, absolutely!”, Solomon assured him with conviction. He must have been expecting something like this. Titus could not readily imagine what Vox had just described.
“How big is the cube?”, the legate wanted to know.
“About my index fingertip to thumb edge length.”
“And four of its points are not clamped?”, Solomon checked.
“Yes.”
“Then try putting a finger to each unclamped point and rotate it in the same direction you rotated the pillar!”
“On it”, Vox confirmed. There was another pause. “Alright, I got it, but I have bad news for you. You have company inbound. Don’t make noise anymore, I’m coming up.”
Titus stood up and put the microbead of his gorget in his ear so that transmissions would not be heard out loud anymore while Solomon sidled up to the wall again. They waited.

Darkness.
Absolute and They moved faster now and reached their destination within twenty minutes. Dusk crept into the sky and the flood had subsided a little. When they peered down into the canyon, the dwindling light showed them that they would have to wait a while longer until they could climb down to the entrance of their objective.
Vox busied himself with putting his helmet back on and giving directions to their brothers to find their way back to them. Apart from his occasional comments, the two Astartes stood silent guard over their human.
When the night had fallen fully, Titus descended into the canyon first. When he found that the water only reached to his waist now, he called the others after him.
Vox took Solomon on his shoulders and climbed down to avoid using the jump pack again. He slipped on the last few metres of wet rock and landed heavily in a great splash, not daring to roll away to compensate for his momentum since he would have squashed the legate with his weight. He straightened up and gently grasped Solomon’s legs that were dangling left and right of his neck.
“You alright?”, he wanted to know.
“Just wet”, Solomon replied bravely and uncurled his arms from Vox’s helmet. Despite his words, Titus was sure that the man had been caught between Vox’s shoulder guards when they fell and that his thighs must have been heavily bruised.
They stood in the darkness, the water flowing around them. There was nothing to see but raw stone walls everywhere and the soft reflections of starlight on the moving surface around them.
“This is it?”, Solomon asked a little uncertainly, rubbing the burn mark on the left side of his face with his left, mechanical hand. He started to shiver in the cool air.
Vox slowly walked up to one part of the wall that looked no different than the rest of the canyon. He gently took Solomon’s organic hand and guided it to a point at head height for an Astartes. “Somewhere here”, he informed him.
“Ah, yes”, Solomon said, leaning forward. “This must be the lock!” His fingers danced searchingly over the stone for a moment then, he took out the ominous key from the Dark Age of Technology. The legate turned the cube over a few times and looked closely at the hole in the rock they had found. “I will need light. Are we alone?”, Solomon wanted to know.
“Yes”, Vox confirmed after a few heartbeats.
Solomon took out a small lamp and its bright, circular light illuminated the lock and the key. Again Solomon turned the cube this way and that and watched it closely. His scar rippled oddly as he grimaced in thought. Meanwhile, Vox had bowed down and leaned his head against the wall to bring the man as close to the lock as possible. Titus had to hide a smile. Seeing them working together as politely and smoothly as this was almost endearing.
“What are you doing?”, Titus inquired of the legate.
“I’m checking if there is a direction in which the cube is meant to be used”, Solomon explained. “I don’t want any self-defence mechanisms going off if I slide it in wrong. This should be it.” He pushed the cube into the wall.
There was hardly any noise. A hollow clicking, a quiet scraping when the door opened, followed by the sound of the water coming in.
“I hope they made whatever is in there waterproof”, Solomon said.
“Well, they made the door waterproof”, Titus answered and waded after Vox, the water flowing in with them.
The initial corridor was short. Beyond it, they entered a circular room.
In the light, Solomon had left on, they made out a simple, but delicately cut relief on the smooth, rounded wall. All of them recognized what it showed immediately. Even though the landmasses looked a bit different than they had come to know them from pictures, there was no doubt about it: It was an image of Terra.
A panel protruded from the swirling water in the middle of the room.
“That looks like an elevator”, Solomon said. “And I don’t think it’ll go up.”
Vox nodded, took him off his shoulders and handed him to Titus like someone would hand around a child. The water had sunken under waist height now but, for the human, this still meant sinking in to his chest and there was a current, even noticeable for someone with the weight of an Astartes.
“Give me the lamp”, Vox demanded softly and got it as soon as Solomon sat safely on Titus’ left shoulder guard. They lost no words about Vox going down there alone. He was the one with a working helmet and could still vox underwater while one of them had to stay up here to protect Solomon.
Calmly, the librarian walked up to the panel. It lit up by itself even as he came close and showed a few mystic signs. Vox laid his hand on one and the floor beneath him started to sink down slowly. Titus braced himself. As he had anticipated the current increased suddenly when the elevator had sunken beyond the thickness of the floor. With force, the water streamed through the wider gap while the platform became a circular waterfall with Vox sinking down in the middle.
In his armour, a Space Marine was heavy enough that he could easily walk underwater. For a moment, they saw the light he carried flicker and reflect in the swirling current in the middle of the room then, it went away. They waited in silence, the water line dropping lower and lower. After a long while, the circular waterfall got quieter and finally stopped. Whatever space was down there, was now filled with water. Left in the upper room was just a waterline that reached lower than Titus’ knee and thus he put the legate down. The man straightened his clothing, waded between him and the wall and said nothing, just waited patiently, shivering in the cold.
“I’ve reached a corridor full of doors”, was the first they heard from Vox. “If there is a machine spirit in here, I can’t find it and they won’t open with force. I’ll move on.”
Again it took a while until Vox came in again. The water was just knee-high for Solomon now.
“I’ve reached a room with a pillar in the middle”, Vox told them. “It’s about fifty paces across and has small compartments all along the wall. They are at about chest-height for me. I don’t see another exit.”
On a signal of the legate, Titus knelt down next to Solomon and opened the channel so he could talk to Vox directly.
“Look at the pillar, please”, the man said and, in the sparse light that filtered in from outside, the expression of his burned face suddenly got intense.
Vox was quiet for a moment. “It is about a metre in diameter and made of the white stone outside. Looks like a natural formation. What am I looking for?”
“For any kind of switch, button, panel or opening”, Solomon said.
Again, there was silence for a minute.
“A part of the pillar can be rotated”, Vox informed them. “There is a cube in here. It is clamped into some kind of holding mechanism.”
“Describe it, please!”, Solomon asked.
“From the bottom and top of the compartment protrudes a triangular bar each. It splits in three and this way clamps the cube, which is standing on its points. Does that make sense to you?”, Vox inquired a little uncertainly.
“Yes, absolutely!”, Solomon assured him with conviction. He must have been expecting something like this. Titus could not readily imagine what Vox had just described.
“How big is the cube?”, the legate wanted to know.
“About my index fingertip to thumb edge length.”
“And four of its points are not clamped?”, Solomon checked.
“Yes.”
“Then try putting a finger to each unclamped point and rotate it in the same direction you rotated the pillar!”
“On it”, Vox confirmed. There was another pause. “Alright, I got it, but I have bad news for you. You have company inbound. Don’t make noise anymore, I’m coming up.”
Titus stood up and put the microbead of his gorget in his ear so that transmissions would not be heard out loud anymore while Solomon sidled up to the wall again. They waited.
velvet thick.

In the darkness?
Nothing much left.
Just the beating of two hearts in his chest.
And the dripping of blood.
Time meant nothing here. Had years gone by? Or aeons? He didn’t know.
In the beginning, counting the pulses of his hearts had provided a rough estimation but he had lost track long ago. 
In the beginning, prayers had soothed and steadied him but their power had dwindled. Back in the beginning, there had been strength and resilience.
Now, only distant memories prevailed. Ghosts of the past, clear like pictures cut into crystals. They haunted his waking hours, repeating and intertwining until nothing was real or reliable anymore.
And behind them loomed the pain.
The pain was worse than the darkness because it sprang from the times of light. From when the inquisitor came to ask questions.
Truth was what he searched for but he had never been satisfied with what his prisoner could offer him. Yet, there had been nothing else to tell. No wound, no drug had changed what the prisoner held true.
Until now.
From two insignificant cuts in his forearms, the blood ran in a steady stream, dripping from his elbows. His superhuman physique should have closed them long ago.
His body had let him down.
Dismay, even darker than the cell, gripped him. Overwhelmed him. Brought him down.
It had been building up from the start.
Now, it had won.
The prisoner wept for his failure and didn’t dare to pray for forgiveness. The next time the inquisitor would come, he would concede to anything. Just to make an end.
The door opened.
Dragged back from far away, Titus had difficulty to focus on the situation. It took him several heartbeats to ascertain that the blinding light Inquisitor Thrax usually carried to mark his entrance was missing. No vengeful sting made him turn his darkness accustomed eyes away. Even the corridor outside seemed dim.
A bulky figure entered. Without a doubt an Astartes in power armour.
Titus wanted to cower in shock and humiliation.
Now! In this darkest, weakest moment, someone came! Not just someone. A brother who knew what a Space Marine should be. What he would find here had no more than a distant memory of this glory left.
As the door shut, the faint light from the corridor vanished. The newcomer stood silently for a moment. Then, Titus sensed him kneeling down close by. He heard a few clinks and a scrape which he identified as the removal of a helmet. The small control light inside painted shapes into the darkness.
With his arms secured by short chains, Titus sat with his back to the wall. For the convenience of his torturers, he was naked. Thus, the newcomer could see all the wounds, fresh and old, scattered across his body. Oh, how Titus wished that at least the tears weren’t running down his cheeks!
He tried to turn his head away but there was something in the brother’s face that caught him. A deep, compassionate sorrow. 
The stranger had the unmistakable soft, almost female features and fair hair of the Blood Angels but he wasn’t wearing a Blood Angel’s armour. The faint light showed no colour, only shade but Titus knew the chapter that bore the sign of the Ordo Xenos on the left shoulder guard. The stranger’s armour would be black and silver. A brother of the Deathwatch knelt in front of him.
The right shoulder though, where his chapter markings should have been displayed, was bare black. It was the insignia on the chest plate which informed Titus that a librarian had come to visit. More specifically, a lexicanum. The lowest rank among the psykically gifted Space Marines.
Titus found himself lost in the brother’s eyes. They were colourless in this light, yet within them lay a severe, unbending intensity Titus had rarely seen before, especially in someone so young. He looked like he had only just made full Astartes.
A Blood Angel. He had the face of an angel indeed and he had come for him, bringing light into the darkness. Not the vengeful light of retribution but a glimmer to be easily endured after the darkness.
He was the first Space Marine Titus had met since he had left Graia and there was something about him promised change. An unbidden spark of hope sprang up inside Titus. He longed for change. He longed for an end, whatever it might look like.
“May the Emperor protect and guide you, Captain Titus of the Ultramarines”, the brother spoke and in the frown on this handsome face, Titus could read how clearly his visitor understood that he needed protection and guidance now more than ever. “I am Vox Draconis of the Deathwatch, serving with Kill Team Aegis. I need to speak to you.”
“What do you want, brother?”, Titus inquired, his voice hoarse after the long neglect.
“Please, tell me what happened after Lieutenant Mira brought you back from the spire.”
“You know her?”
Vox Draconis hesitated for a moment and leaned a little closer. “Time is short”, he said. “Stay focused now, I’ll tell you later.”
At this moment, the modest spark of hope ignited into a mighty flame of relief, threatening to overwhelm him. Change! And the brother thought there would be a ‘later’. Did this mean his torment was finally over? What if it wasn’t? Again, the eyes of his visitor were what caught him, steadying his rampaging thoughts while Titus struggled to gather them as best he could. “Leandros…”
The brother nodded as Titus trailed off. “I know names”, he said soothingly. “Just tell me.”
“Leandros was waiting for me with Inquisitor Thrax”, Titus managed. “He accused me of having fallen to chaotic corruption and, when the inquisitor threatened to exterminate everyone who had fought alongside me, I turned myself in.”
Vox Draconis nodded encouragingly. “What exactly was the accusation Leandros brought forth?”
“He said that, hence my survival of touching the warp device, I must have deep ties to the warp and by this have fallen to chaos.”
The brother’s eyes bored into his and Titus got the distinct impression that he wasn’t hearing any of this for the first time.
“Is Leandros a librarian?” It was a strange question and the captain didn’t immediately understand where it was leading.
“No”, he answered cautiously. “He was one of my tactical marines at the time.”
“How could he have posed such an accurate statement then?”, Vox Draconis inquired with a soft voice.
“Drogan spoke of it. So did Nemeroth…”, Titus said bemusedly.
“Drogan was the inquisitor possessed by a daemon when you met him?”, the brother wanted to know.
“Yes.”
Vox Draconis smiled suddenly. It wasn’t a friendly smile. “And Nemeroth was the traitor that tried to become a daemon prince?”
“Yes, he was. Brother, may I inquire what aim you have in mind?”, Titus asked cautiously but the smile on the pale face only deepened, bearing a joke that wasn’t to be shared. The estimation beckoned that it was a joke to cost somebody their head.
“Thank you, captain”, he said with the fire of an unknown victory in his eyes and, without fuss, he reached out. Gently, gently he stroked over Titus’ cheeks and wiped the tears away. Made them a secret to be kept as well.
“Please, answer just this last question”, the young brother continued. “Do I gather correctly, that you were taken by Thrax on the accusations of someone who got his vital information for said accusations from creatures of chaos?”
In the baffled silence that followed, the dripping of Titus’ blood sounded particularly loud.

They moved faster now and reached their destination within twenty minutes. Dusk crept into the sky and the flood had subsided a little. When they peered down into the canyon, the dwindling light showed them that they would have to wait a while longer until they could climb down to the entrance of their objective.
Vox busied himself with putting his helmet back on and giving directions to their brothers to find their way back to them. Apart from his occasional comments, the two Astartes stood silent guard over their human.
When the night had fallen fully, Titus descended into the canyon first. When he found that the water only reached to his waist now, he called the others after him.
Vox took Solomon on his shoulders and climbed down to avoid using the jump pack again. He slipped on the last few metres of wet rock and landed heavily in a great splash, not daring to roll away to compensate for his momentum since he would have squashed the legate with his weight. He straightened up and gently grasped Solomon’s legs that were dangling left and right of his neck.
“You alright?”, he wanted to know.
“Just wet”, Solomon replied bravely and uncurled his arms from Vox’s helmet. Despite his words, Titus was sure that the man had been caught between Vox’s shoulder guards when they fell and that his thighs must have been heavily bruised.
They stood in the darkness, the water flowing around them. There was nothing to see but raw stone walls everywhere and the soft reflections of starlight on the moving surface around them.
“This is it?”, Solomon asked a little uncertainly, rubbing the burn mark on the left side of his face with his left, mechanical hand. He started to shiver in the cool air.
Vox slowly walked up to one part of the wall that looked no different than the rest of the canyon. He gently took Solomon’s organic hand and guided it to a point at head height for an Astartes. “Somewhere here”, he informed him.
“Ah, yes”, Solomon said, leaning forward. “This must be the lock!” His fingers danced searchingly over the stone for a moment then, he took out the ominous key from the Dark Age of Technology. The legate turned the cube over a few times and looked closely at the hole in the rock they had found. “I will need light. Are we alone?”, Solomon wanted to know.
“Yes”, Vox confirmed after a few heartbeats.
Solomon took out a small lamp and its bright, circular light illuminated the lock and the key. Again Solomon turned the cube this way and that and watched it closely. His scar rippled oddly as he grimaced in thought. Meanwhile, Vox had bowed down and leaned his head against the wall to bring the man as close to the lock as possible. Titus had to hide a smile. Seeing them working together as politely and smoothly as this was almost endearing.
“What are you doing?”, Titus inquired of the legate.
“I’m checking if there is a direction in which the cube is meant to be used”, Solomon explained. “I don’t want any self-defence mechanisms going off if I slide it in wrong. This should be it.” He pushed the cube into the wall.
There was hardly any noise. A hollow clicking, a quiet scraping when the door opened, followed by the sound of the water coming in.
“I hope they made whatever is in there waterproof”, Solomon said.
“Well, they made the door waterproof”, Titus answered and waded after Vox, the water flowing in with them.
The initial corridor was short. Beyond it, they entered a circular room.
In the light, Solomon had left on, they made out a simple, but delicately cut relief on the smooth, rounded wall. All of them recognized what it showed immediately. Even though the landmasses looked a bit different than they had come to know them from pictures, there was no doubt about it: It was an image of Terra.
A panel protruded from the swirling water in the middle of the room.
“That looks like an elevator”, Solomon said. “And I don’t think it’ll go up.”
Vox nodded, took him off his shoulders and handed him to Titus like someone would hand around a child. The water had sunken under waist height now but, for the human, this still meant sinking in to his chest and there was a current, even noticeable for someone with the weight of an Astartes.
“Give me the lamp”, Vox demanded softly and got it as soon as Solomon sat safely on Titus’ left shoulder guard. They lost no words about Vox going down there alone. He was the one with a working helmet and could still vox underwater while one of them had to stay up here to protect Solomon.
Calmly, the librarian walked up to the panel. It lit up by itself even as he came close and showed a few mystic signs. Vox laid his hand on one and the floor beneath him started to sink down slowly. Titus braced himself. As he had anticipated the current increased suddenly when the elevator had sunken beyond the thickness of the floor. With force, the water streamed through the wider gap while the platform became a circular waterfall with Vox sinking down in the middle.
In his armour, a Space Marine was heavy enough that he could easily walk underwater. For a moment, they saw the light he carried flicker and reflect in the swirling current in the middle of the room then, it went away. They waited in silence, the water line dropping lower and lower. After a long while, the circular waterfall got quieter and finally stopped. Whatever space was down there, was now filled with water. Left in the upper room was just a waterline that reached lower than Titus’ knee and thus he put the legate down. The man straightened his clothing, waded between him and the wall and said nothing, just waited patiently, shivering in the cold.
“I’ve reached a corridor full of doors”, was the first they heard from Vox. “If there is a machine spirit in here, I can’t find it and they won’t open with force. I’ll move on.”
Again it took a while until Vox came in again. The water was just knee-high for Solomon now.
“I’ve reached a room with a pillar in the middle”, Vox told them. “It’s about fifty paces across and has small compartments all along the wall. They are at about chest-height for me. I don’t see another exit.”
On a signal of the legate, Titus knelt down next to Solomon and opened the channel so he could talk to Vox directly.
“Look at the pillar, please”, the man said and, in the sparse light that filtered in from outside, the expression of his burned face suddenly got intense.
Vox was quiet for a moment. “It is about a metre in diameter and made of the white stone outside. Looks like a natural formation. What am I looking for?”
“For any kind of switch, button, panel or opening”, Solomon said.
Again, there was silence for a minute.
“A part of the pillar can be rotated”, Vox informed them. “There is a cube in here. It is clamped into some kind of holding mechanism.”
“Describe it, please!”, Solomon asked.
“From the bottom and top of the compartment protrudes a triangular bar each. It splits in three and this way clamps the cube, which is standing on its points. Does that make sense to you?”, Vox inquired a little uncertainly.
“Yes, absolutely!”, Solomon assured him with conviction. He must have been expecting something like this. Titus could not readily imagine what Vox had just described.
“How big is the cube?”, the legate wanted to know.
“About my index fingertip to thumb edge length.”
“And four of its points are not clamped?”, Solomon checked.
“Yes.”
“Then try putting a finger to each unclamped point and rotate it in the same direction you rotated the pillar!”
“On it”, Vox confirmed. There was another pause. “Alright, I got it, but I have bad news for you. You have company inbound. Don’t make noise anymore, I’m coming up.”
Titus stood up and put the microbead of his gorget in his ear so that transmissions would not be heard out loud anymore while Solomon sidled up to the wall again. They waited.

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Guide Me Through the Darkness by Julia M. V. Warren is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

This Post Has One Comment

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